Home

Spot the Real Letter!

October 30, 2012

May 26, 1817 – May 17, 1818

Thomas Jefferson to John Adams, May 17, 1818:
“I enter into all your doubts as to the event of the revolution of S. America. They will succeed against Spain. But the dangerous enemy is within their own breasts. Ignorance and superstition will chain their minds and bodies under religious and military despotism. I do believe it would be better for them to obtain freedom by degrees only; because that would by degrees bring on light and information, and qualify them to take charge of themselves understandingly; with more certainty if in the mean time under so much controul only as may keep them at peace with one another. Surely it is our duty to wish them independence and self-government, because they wish it themselves, and they have the right, and we none, to chuse for themselves: and I wish moreover that our ideas may be erroneous, and theirs prove well founded.”

Thomas Jefferson to John Adams, May 17, 2012:
“I enter into all your doubts as to the event of the revolution of Syria. They will succeed against Bashar al-Assad. But the dangerous enemy is within their own breasts. Ignorance and superstition will chain their minds and bodies under religious and military despotism. I do believe it would be better for them to obtain freedom by degrees only; because that would by degrees bring on light and information, and qualify them to take charge of themselves understandingly; with more certainty if in the mean time under so much controul only as may keep them at peace with one another. Surely it is our duty to wish them independence and self-government, because they wish it themselves, and they have the right, and we none, to chuse for themselves: and I wish moreover that our ideas may be erroneous, and theirs prove well founded.”

Thomas Jefferson to John Adams, May 17, 1860:
“I enter into all your doubts as to the notion of emancipation. The slaves will succeed against their masters. But the dangerous enemy is within their own breasts. Ignorance and superstition will chain their minds and bodies with stagnation and vengeance. I do believe it would be better for them to obtain freedom by degrees only; because that would by degrees bring on light and information, and qualify them to take charge of themselves understandingly; with more certainty if in the mean time under so much controul only as may keep them at peace with us. Surely it is our duty to wish them independence, because they wish it themselves, and they have the right, and we none, to chuse for themselves: and I wish moreover that our ideas may be erroneous, and theirs prove well founded.”

Thomas Jefferson to French dude, May 17, 1776:
“I enter into all your doubts as to the event of the revolution of the American colonies. We will succeed against Britain. But the dangerous enemy is within our own breasts. Ignorance and superstition will chain our minds and bodies under religious and military despotism. I do believe it would be better for us to obtain freedom by degrees only; because that would by degrees bring on light and information, and qualify us to take charge of ourselves understandingly; with more certainty if in the mean time under so much controul only as may keep us at peace with one another. Surely it is your duty to wish us independence and self-government, because we wish it ourselves, and we have the right, and you none, to chuse for ourselves: and I wish moreover that your ideas may be erroneous, and ours prove well founded.”

Is this at all helpful? Jefferson’s real words made me think how this refrain seems to echo throughout the history of revolutions and freedom fights. I think our current president made a similar point in a recent debate—not the same point, but similar. Something about how his administration’s pace of movement in supporting the rebellion in Syria depends on whether a legitimate replacement of President Assad can be identified (rather than replacing him with another terrorist regime). The argument was there for Egypt’s overthrow of Hosni Mubarak, too.

It may or may not make sense for Syria and Egypt; it’s an open question. In the case of American slavery and the American Revolution, it sounds like hogwash, right? Freedom now! Except that it was as open a question during their time as it is today.

So we’re back to the old “hindsight is 20/20” conundrum. Again, is it helpful? Should we be learning anything from this? Should we be yelling “Freedom!” and dropping a SEAL team on Assad’s house about now? Or is our moral clarity over American colonial rebellion and immediate emancipation for slaves just part of the myth-making that occurs over time? During the American Revolution, plenty of fence-sitters were all for freedom but weren’t interested in paying the price of war. Leading up to the American Civil War, plenty of anti-slavery people feared that immediate emancipation would leave slaves—without education, legal protection, job skills—at the mercy of former masters who would simply employ them in equally dismal serf-like conditions.

Maybe “morality” isn’t the issue. Abraham Lincoln was morally against slavery, but he signed the Emancipation Proclamation to win the war, not to end slavery (and the Proclamation didn’t free all slaves, just those in the “rebellious states”).

On the other hand, when you compare the North American colonies with the South American colonies, Jefferson (Mr. Declaration of Independence) sounds like an ass. We get our freedom, but they’re too ignorant to handle it? Was Jefferson being a hypocrite or is my moral clarity getting in the way?

How’s that for a mash-up of current Middle Eastern events, global colonial history, and the American Civil War?

Advertisements

5 Responses to “Spot the Real Letter!”

  1. Teatree Says:

    As I finish the book, “Nomad” by Ayaan Hirsi Ali – the Somali woman (Muslim) who is challenging the oppression of women under the name of Islam – the same issues of emancipation, liberty, cultural certainties and respect – I’m tempted to write a similar letter concerning women’s honor killings and sexual oppression stemming from the Islamic tenets.

    You have posted fodder for rich discussion on many issues.


    • Great example. Some issues, like slavery and women’s rights, seem to have more clarity than others, although you’ve brought up new components to the complexities of morality, like religion and cultural traditions.

  2. lisa Says:

    Based on Thomas Jefferson’s birthday, I am hoping that the real letter was the first, that being 1818. Yes, i believe you are right, this same argument could hold true for our stand in Afghanistan now. Vietnam then.


  3. Yes, did the French dude give it away? Oppression, slavery, Syria, Afghanistan, Vietnam, my head hurts. Are we learning anything from history? CAN we?

  4. lisa Says:

    No actually TJ’s letter to JA dated May 17, 2012, gave it away. Perhaps America has a mission, certainly we have an agenda. God is still in control.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: